Nuclear submarines for Australia – what are the options?

Navy Lookout – The political and strategic ramifications of the AUKUS pact announced in September continue to reverberate but the details of how Australia will actually acquire nuclear-powered submarines have been rather overlooked. Here we focus on the daunting technical, industrial and financial challenges to be overcome on the long road to joining the SSN club.

What AUKUS Means For Australia: More Than Nuclear Subs

Breaking Defense – When the United States, United Kingdom and Australia announced their new AUKUS agreement, the major focus was on the path for Australia to acquire nuclear-powered submarines for the first time. But that headline aside, there is much more to the agreement, which could represent a major shift  in Indo-Pacific strategic and military relations for the three nations.

Don’t Count Your Submarines Before They’re Built

War on the Rocks – Because AUKUS focuses on technology sharing, it is different than a traditional arms sale, and this difference has two key implications. First, the deal is a stronger signal of the participants’ long-term concern about China’s rise. Second, and conversely, it will be more difficult to implement the deal in a way that lives up to its claims.

Perception that France is ‘too soft’ on China fed Australia submarine dispute

France 24 – As France rages over last week’s Australia-UK-US (AUKUS) defence deal that saw Canberra ditch multibillion dollar submarine contracts, analysts suggest Paris should not have been so shocked – considering Australia’s desire for nuclear submarine technology rooted in its fear of a Chinese threat, alongside a broader Anglophone perception that France’s China policy is too ambiguous.

Australia Reportedly Looking At An Alternative To Its Costly New French-Designed Submarines

War Zone – Australia’s plans to introduce 12 advanced new Attack class submarines may have hit a new snag. The huge cost of the French-designed conventional submarines, which will likely feature air-independent propulsionand other advanced technologies, means that officials may be examining whether they might instead replace the Royal Australian Navy’s six existing Collins class boats with an updated version of this same design. 

Australia to Join U.S., India, Japan for Malabar 2020 in High-End Naval Exercise of ‘The Quad’

USNI News – Australia will join the India-led Malabar 2020 naval exercise next month, operating along with the U.S. and Japan in an exercise meant to send a message to China. The exercise will be a first for the so-called “Quad,” the Pacific cooperation between Japan, India, Australia and the U.S.