Analysis: The Future Of The Turkish Navy

Naval News – The presence and visibility of the Turkish Naval Forces have increased considerably within the Blue Homeland doctrine framework for several years. Regional disputes require Turkish naval forces to deploy more at sea. Thus, the Turkish defense industry’s national policy has supported the continuously active Turkish Navy, and a force composition is formed with indigenous weapons and systems.

‘Blue Homeland’ and the Irredentist Future of Turkish Foreign Policy

War on the Rocks – Turkey and Greece, two NATO allies, nearly experienced a full-fledged military conflict in August. Two of their warships collided during a naval standoff over hydrocarbon exploration in the Eastern Mediterranean. This follows a similar naval incident in June between three Turkish vessels and the frigate of another NATO ally, France, prompting an inquiry that the alliance has been trying to keep under wraps to prevent further discord among its ranks. Behind these incidents lies Turkey’s embrace of an assertive naval concept, namely the “blue homeland,” that is poised to disrupt the transatlantic alliance in the years to come.

Blue Homeland: The Heated Politics Behind Turkey’s New Maritime Strategy

War on the Rocks – “Mavi vatan,” or “blue homeland,” has become a common phrase in Turkish political life. It is most often used as a shorthand expression for Ankara’s maritime claims in the eastern Mediterranean. Central to these interests is the presence of large deposits of natural gas off the coast of the island of Cyprus. For Turkey, the lion’s share of these deposits lies within what Turkey interprets is its exclusive economic zone. Such a stance, however, is at odds with claims made by Greece and the Republic of Cyprus.

Turkish universal landing ship Anadolu on the water

BMPD – built for the Turkish Navy at the Turkish shipyard Sedef Tuzla Tersanesi in Tuzla (southern outskirts of the Asian part of Istanbul) by Sedef Gemi İnşaatı Sanayii A.Ş (part of the Turkon holding) the first Turkish universal landing ship (UDC) L 400 Anadolu first surfaced in the enterprise’s dry 310-meter-filled construction dock, and then was towed from the dock to the extension wall. The actual descent of the UDC on the water was carried out without special ceremonies.

(Thanks to Alain)

Shoulder-Fired Surface-To-Air Missiles Spotted Aboard Russian Navy Ship In Turkish Strait

FoxtrotAlpha – Turkish-Russian relations are in the gutter since the downing of that attack jet, yet it is not exactly a relationship in which one party can just ignore the other. Both economies are intertwined and Russia has to pass through Turkey’s Bosphorus Strait in order to access the Mediterranean from the Black Sea. Turkey may have reminded Russia of this very recently, but it still does not explain why Russian sailors were donning shoulder-fired surface-air-missiles today during one of Russia’s amphibious ship’s transits.

Turkey May Be Hinting At Playing Its Trump Card, Blocking Russia’s Bosphorus Access

FoxtrotAlpha – Turkey, and especially Istanbul, has been called the crossroads of the world, geographically and commercially connecting Europe with Asia, and the Mediterranean with the Black Sea. The latter of which happens to be crucial to Russian shipping and especially its naval operations, acting as a corridor for the Black Sea Fleet to access the world. With tensions broiling over Turkey’s shooting-down of a Russian Su-24, and with Russian sanctions looming, Turkey may be brandishing its ultimate “soft power” weapon in hopes of controlling Moscow’s response; shutting down or slowing Russia’s access to the strategic nexus between the Black Sea and the Mediterranean, the Bosphorus Strait.