The first test of the Ukrainian Neptune missile with the homing head installed

BMPD – Ukrainian sources reported that on April 2, 2020, the Alibey State Testing Ground of the Armed Forces of Ukraine in the Odessa region tested the R-360 anti-ship missile of the developed Ukrainian anti-ship missile complex RK-360MTs Neptune with an active homing radar mounted on the rocket for the first time.

(Thanks to Alain)

Ukrainian Sailors Injured, Held After Russia Seizes Three Warships

USNI News – Russian maritime forces have fired on and seized three Ukrainian naval vessels that were attempting to sail from the Black Sea into the Sea of Azov.More than 20 Ukrainian sailors were also detained by Russians – several of them reportedly suffering injuries – after open hostilities erupted on Nov. 25 in the Kerch Strait, which separates Russian-occupied Crimean Peninsula from mainland Russia.

Building an Asymmetric Ukrainian Naval Force to Defend the Sea of Azov, Part 2

CIMSEC – The following two-part series will analyze the maritime dimension of competition between Ukraine and Russia in the Sea of Azov. Part 1 analyzed strategic interests, developments, and geography in the Sea of Azov along with probable Russian avenues of aggression. Part 2 will devise potential asymmetric naval capabilities and strategies for the Ukrainian Navy to employ.

Rebuilding the Ukrainian Navy

US Naval War College Review – This article examines the Ukrainian governments attempts to rebuild the Ukrainian navy and argues that, while Ukraine faces political, conceptual, and financial challenges in reviving its maritime power, it has made some modest progress toward building a “mosquito fleet.” This fleet has been bolstered by the addition of some small, new ships and the increasing professionalization of Ukraine’s naval personnel, in particular its marines. This progress suggests that Ukraine can go in a radically different direction as it redevelops its navy: toward coastal defense.

Ukraine’s hobbled navy: “Times are not the best”

AP – Ukraine’s navy is in Odessa’s harbor, though it can be hard to spot. It’s tucked behind a collection of storage tanks and overshadowed by immense cargo vessels docked nearby. There are a couple dozen boats, few much larger than a decent-sized yacht and many in desperate need of repair. The government is begging the public to help pay their bills. This is what’s left of Ukraine’s fleet since Russia annexed the Crimean Peninsula two months ago, taking with it the navy’s key base and most of its ships.