The Med Migrant Crisis and Defend Europe

CIMSEC – This summer while many European vacationers bask on sunny Mediterranean beaches, out in the water, hundreds of people are fighting for their lives while an increasingly more complex and robust collection of maritime non-government organizations (NGOs) (see Table 1) alternatively try to rescue them from drowning or send them back to Africa. The line between maritime human trafficking and a flow of refugees at sea has been blurred. In response to the ongoing migrant wave, the group Defend Europe recently raised enough money to charter a 422-ton ship, the C-Star, to convey a team of its activists to Libya. They arrived in the search-and-rescue zone off the Libyan coast on August 4-5.

Dueling NGOs on the Seas: What Ships are For

War on the Rocks – Today’s ideological battles are not simply confined to land or cyberspace. Nor is conflict at sea reserved for state-sponsored navies. The high seas are increasingly a battlespace for non-government organizations (NGOs). Although organizations such as Greenpeace and Sea Shepherd Conservation Society have been conducting maritime operations in support of their environmental missions for four decades, in recent years other maritime NGOs have emerged for a variety of causes.

How a nuclear war in Korea could start, and how it might end

The Economist – An interesting scenario of nuclear conflict between the U.S. and North Korea.

War Studies Primer

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America May Soon Find Itself in an Underwater War with China

National Interest – In the years to come, Chinese and U.S. drones will likely be in a high stakes cat and mouse game in the Pacific.

How China’s Navy Is Preparing to Fight in the ‘Far Seas’

National Interest – Two PLA Navy officers might have a clue.

A Grim Future For Russia’s Nuclear Sub Fleet

War is Boring – The Kremlin can’t replace its aging subs fast enough.

Why the U.S. Navy Shouldn’t Fear China’s ‘Hunt for Red October’ Missile Submarines

National Interest – James Holmes writes that word has it that China’s People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLA Navy) has staged a breakthrough in submarine propulsion.

The Arctic Could Be the Next South China Sea, Says Coast Guard Commandant

Defense One – Rich with energy resources, minerals and strategic positioning, the warming Arctic is ripe for territorial disputes, Adm. Zukunft warns.

Watching Russia’s Syrian build-up from central Istanbul

BBC – The ship spotters of Istanbul have become a key resource for diplomats and intelligence experts, alerting the world to the scale of Russia’s campaign in Syria.

War Studies Primer

Visit the War Studies Primer for an introductory course on the study of war.

Look at slides 2 and 3 in the War Studies Primer for its Table of Contents, and then choose a lecture to read and enjoy.

Ways to Follow NOSI

You can also follow NOSI via RSS at nosi.org/feed or receive an email every time a blog post is published by entering your email address and clicking on the Follow button in the right hand column of the site or on Facebook at facebook.com/nosintel or on Twitter at twitter.com/nosintel

Danes Tout $340M Stanflex Frigate For US Navy – But What’s Real Cost?

Breaking Defense – Denmark really wants you to know they have a solution for the US Navy’s frigate problem. Pentagon officials are on the record that they’ll consider foreign designs in their quest for a more powerful small warship than the $450–$550 million, 3,400-ton Littoral Combat Ship. The Danish answer: their $340 million, 6,600-ton Iver Huitfeldt “Stanflex” frigate.

Latin American Navies and Antarctica

CIMSEC – Latin American governments have a strong presence in Antarctica, with two countries, Argentina and Chile, formally claiming Antarctic territories while several others carry out annual scientific expeditions (apart from having research bases there). Regional navies are of paramount importance in these operations as they are the spearhead of their respective nations’ expeditions and security initiatives in Antarctic waters. In fact, in recent months, there have been new developments that signal a greater Latin American naval presence in the Antarctic in the near future: Peru has commissioned its new oceanographic vessel while Chile has commenced the construction of a new icebreaker.

The Future of Naval Warfare Will Have a Lot More Spy Submarines

War Zone – Advanced, but relatively small kits will allow even conventional subs to become increasingly powerful intelligence collectors.

Japan Considering Buying Tomahawks for Destroyer Fleet to Deter North Korea

USNI News – Officials in Japan are weighing arming their fleet of guided-missile destroyers with Tomahawk land-attack cruise missiles as a hedge against North Korean missile attacks.

Maritime Territorial and Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) Disputes Involving China: Issues for Congress

Congressional Research Service – Ronald O’Rourke’s latest report on the Chinese Maritime Militia.

Japanese warships join with carrier Vinson on exercises

Defense News – Two Japanese destroyers joined up with the Carl Vinson carrier strike group in the Philippine Sea Sunday for renewed bilateral exercises, the Japan-based U.S. Seventh Fleet announced. The Vinson is headed north for the Sea of Japan in an expression of U.S. resolve as North Korea continues to develop offensive ballistic missiles with nuclear capability.

How a Chinese fishing fleet creates facts on the water

Economist – Bad news for giant clams and for the other littoral states in the South China Sea.

Hainan’s Maritime Militia: China Builds a Standing Vanguard Part 1.

CIMSEC – The first of a three-part conclusion on the maritime militia of Hainan Province.

Taiwan President Announces Start of Domestic Submarine Program

USNI News – The president of Taiwan announced the start of a domestic submarine program. Taiwan estimates the process will take ten years for the first attack boat to be ready – four for design, four for construction and two additional years of testing.

French carrier to lead joint amphibious Pacific drill in show of force aimed at China

Reuters – In a display of military power aimed at China, France will dispatch one of its powerful Mistral amphibious carriers to lead drills on and around Tinian island in the western Pacific, with Japanese and U.S. personnel and two troop-carrying helicopters sent by Britain.

Russia’s Most Powerful Nuclear Attack Submarine Ever Is Almost Ready for Sea

National Interest – Russia is set to launch its second Yasen-class nuclear-powered attack submarine on March 30. Called Kazan, the new vessel is an upgraded Project 885M design that is in many ways much more capable than the lead ship of the class, K-560 Severodvinsk.

China’s Navy Gets a New Helmsman (Part 1): Spotlight on Vice Admiral Shen Jinlong

China Brief – A new leader has just taken the helm of the world’s largest navy. Vice Admiral Shen Jinlong (沈金龙) reportedly replaced Admiral Wu Shengli (吴胜利) as PLAN Commander on January 17, 2017. Authoritative state media reports have offered few details on Shen, making it important to analyze a broad array of Chinese-language sources to distill what his elevation may mean for China as a maritime power.